Grassroots Revolution vs. Astroturf Terror

falseflagBy Mike Palecek

The most important town hall meetings, café coffee discussions, or instruction, learning, discussion of any type taking place today in the United States are in the comments sections of Memory Hole Blog and Veterans Today.

I have never joined in before, except to listen. I had a thought the other day and just would like to ask MHB readers what they think. If you go here you will find a map entitled “History Is A Weapon, Guerilla War in the United States 1965-1970.” Hover your cursor over the marks and get details of many anti-government attacks in the United States 1965-70. Go here and see many people still in United States prisons for actions (violent) taken against the United States military and government. I guess I have more than one question, but anyway, the first one:

Given what we know of fake terror events in recent years, are we to assume that all these events were organic?

Here is something from Fr. Daniel Berrigan, who knew something about the political protest scene in those days. “I have a very great sense that there is going to be much more sabotage and that the government itself is inducing it.” – Fr. Daniel Berrigan, interview with Scanlan’s Monthly while underground for burning draft files at Catonsville, published January 1971 issue “Guerilla War in the U.S.A.” But when you search through those photos and names and descriptions on the Jericho Movement website you will see “In Prison 20 years,” In Prison 38 years,” 33 years, 41 years, and it goes on and on. So, these folks are for real. Second question:

Why are almost all of those people from the ‘60s and ‘70s, that era?

Is it because we have lost heart? I asked Jim Fetzer about this. His response:

Mike, Nixon ended the draft and the consequences have been enormous. Most families no longer care about issues of war and peace because they know that, whatever happens, their children will not be affected. There were real reasons for the young to resist. Now they don’t care. Jim

There were also leftist bombings, leftists fighting back in the earlier part of the century and beyond: the 1920 Wall Street bombing, Haymarket Square bombing in 1886, Palmer Raids begin in July 1919 in response to alleged anarchist bombings in April and June of government officials, businessmen and law enforcement officials, including the home of Attorney General Alexander Palmer in Washington, D.C. It just seems to me kind of strange — all those people in jail for real resistance from decades ago. None now, and all now are false flag events. And of course, there is always the question of violence versus non-violence. But my questions here are more about the motivation, of moving, getting off the sofa, out the door, down the street. I don’t advocate violence, bombing, but I would also have to insert that to contemplate such is to choose to become more deeply involved than when joining a march, with one pretty much guaranteed of being back in time for the pizza and beer celebration. We don’t have that now, except phony FBI traps that purport to have prevented terror events, when actually it is they who conduct the whole exercise. I guess I am just amazed when I see these people, their photos, their descriptions, and beside it says “33 years in prison,” “40 years in prison.” They might say they are political prisoners, prisoners of war. Class-war, ideological warfare. We could decide to say they belong there because they hurt people, stole money. And we can also wonder what we would think of them if they were now in power rather than in prison. Did Franklin, Washington, Jefferson, Paine consider killing and theft beyond their reach, things they would not do to obtain “freedom.” We could choose to say that non-violence is the only way to go.

But how can we go forward without any thought to those who are STILL in prison for revolution, fighting against America, as we also say we are.

That’s all I got, look forward to hearing your thoughts.


Independent author Mike Palecek lives near Duluth, Minnesota. He is the co-host of The New American Dream Radio Show on the Revolution Radio Network and author of The Dynamic Duo: White Rose Blooms in Wisconsin: Kevin Barrett, Jim Fetzer & the American Resistance. His website is

40 thoughts on “Grassroots Revolution vs. Astroturf Terror”

  1. Revolution isn’t possible in the USA without a change of political culture. Most Americans, including MHB commenters, identify with American power against the American people. Americans are against Government when their major enemy is the capitalist oligarchy that controls the government. It doesn’t matter what kind of government you have if it serves the interests of the 1% against the people.

    When the War on Communism of the 20th century segued into the War on Terrorism of the 21st, the oligarchy that has ruled us historically essentially BOUGHT the American government. Already owning the corporations, they preselected and financed the candidates of the Electoral system, and their lobbyists helped write the legislation of the Elected. Their reps were placed in the offices that were supposed to regulate capitalism, allowing their corporations to steal from the American people anything that wasn’t nailed down.

    To divert attention from the criminal power system, Washington embarked on endless, low-intensity wars, making effective criticism of the American power system Un-Patriotic. The policies and power of the state power system was legitimated in the corporate media, or Free Press. It generated an Orwellian truth tradition that was an ideological fraud from beginning to end.

    But the American people have been intimidated to be afraid to say so in a simple holistic way. We therefore cannot develop an ideology that enables us to unite effective to challenge American power. So the American power system continues to go to the right, now explicitly imposing a Nazi-oligarch regime in Ukraine, while White cops shoot unarmed Blacks, and a White power movement gains strength. Without a change of political culture, the outlook is predictable, bleak, and extremely dangerous in a world where nuclear weapons are spreading, and US is trying to stave off a decline in power by violence and war.

  2. Despite the techno-tyranny and corporate bought government, the people still hold the power. They just do not understand or care due to the mind-control/matrix apparatus in place. The founders had to utilize force in liberating themselves because no other option existed at the time. Now, we have options. Force is one (however, until it tipped the balance you would most likely end up dead or sharing prison time with the aforementioned above). Dismantling the public ed/media propaganda stranglehold is another (but how?). Starving the beast is the one option I like best. I think if we all decided to adopt decentralized crypto-currency for money we could achieve this one.

    1. A great article on Bitcoin by Sander Duivestein, professional speaker and trendwatcher at VINT, the International Research Institute of Sogeti. He writes, “The blockchain is a shared single source of truth. Or as Alex and Don Tapscott explained it: ’It basically enables a global spreadsheet — an incorruptible digital ledger of economic transactions that can be programmed to record not just financial transactions but virtually everything of value and importance to humankind: birth and death certificates, marriage licenses, deeds and titles of ownership, educational degrees, financial accounts, medical procedures, insurance claims, votes, transactions between smart objects, and anything else that can be expressed in code.’

      No wonder that the popes of our modern economy find it hard to grasp how Bitcoin and blockchain technology works. A new Renaissance might be at the horizon. The blockchain not only radically transforms the way we do commerce, but it basically redefines the nature of the firm and has the potential to fundamentally shift the way in which our society is hierarchically organised.”

    2. “..the people still hold the power.”

      No, we don’t. The capitalist oligarchy of billionaires, multi-billionaires, and aspiring billionaires, the 1% hold the power. They have essentially bought the American government. By stating that ‘the people hold the power,’ an unrealism is created which prevents the people from uniting effectively to really control the state power system.

      1. The power you refer to (held by the 1%) is an illusion. I refer to corporate bought government as that is true. Yet, the money is fake. Any policy in violation of the Constitution is illegitimate. You do understand that if we all woke up and turned on the system it would be forced to comply, no? I encourage you to rethink what power is. It is within the majority of good people – just dormant.

        1. Power is the ability to gain support to overcome opposition to win conflicts, or make decisions. The 1% have such power. Money, among other things, is a power asset. It can buy consent and overcome dissent. Adelson, who has nearly 40 billion dollars just bought congress, to support Israeli imperialism and Natanyahoo over American imperialism. Nothing illusionary about that. His money is not fake.

          In order for the American people to take power, we not only have to wake up, we have to unite on a common geopolitical strategy and policy. the oligarchs are powerful because they unite against the people. The people can only be powerful if we unite against the oligarchs. But the people are so deluded–I mention no names–that we identify with the oligarchs, or deny they have any power.

    3. I’ve pondered the same question, that being how are we to take back the reigns of power that we could put an end to the government’s framing of patsies and breeding of phoney terrorists. I like your suggestion of “starving the beast.” I also appreciate the sentiment of others here who added we shouldn’t adopt their philosophy of, “the ends justifies the means.”

      Few will recall my other comments of a similar nature, so at least I’m not yet a broken record. And, it shouldn’t be assumed that I stand behind this idea completely and don’t myself question its viability. In defense of my idea, I will say that I think the times are grave and the situation desperate. Just the fact that so many of us congregate in places like this to discuss these issues without simply taking some kind of action indicates that, either we’re not sure what to do or the system has already evolved to the point were our options are few.

      I think one means to achieve a number of our goals as a people is to disable the transmission capabilities of the media. Yes, this would equate to an act of vandalism. It would involve a number of groups with a solid understanding of the technology planning and carrying out the disabling of satellite, cable, radio and other land-based media transmission hubs. It’s not known by me whether it could be done largely through hacking or requires the physical destruction of equipment. I still think the result would be worth it in either case.

      The first reaction people tend to have to this idea is to recoil and view it as a violent act. I think, because it would involved destruction of property and not necessarily pose any risk to human life I have to disagree. The reason we now know so much about CO-INTEL-PRO was that a group of average citizens plotted and carried out a break-in and robbery of a local FBI branch. Few today would argue they overstepped their rights in doing so.

      Try to imagine the public’s reaction to waking up to static on their televisions and through their car radios. First, you can be sure that no event like Sandy Hook would go forward on such a day. Some will view that as justification alone. But, as the news began to spread that this was an act of rebellion and the message delivered that the purpose was to wake the public up, I strongly suspect that they would both view the perpetrators as folk-heroes and begin to wake up. For some, it will be the first time they’d ever heard of the media’s deceptions. For sure it will be the first time that everyone will hear of it at the same time.

      If a revolution of any kind were to take place again in America, it would be triggered by an act of this type. Can you think of any other acts that might trigger a revolution you’d be more comfortable with? Perhaps one initiated by the government in cooperation with the media?

  3. In a direct confrontation with Empire, Americans have the same chance as Israelites against Rome- i.e., none. However, one should keep in mind that Christianity conquered Rome and Europe. I believe that Wikileaks, Assange, Anonymous and the whistleblower movement for government transparency, are much more efficacious tools than any violent attempt to conquer Empire- let’s face it, there is a reason why the FBI informant is the first “activist” to suggest violence, namely, it’s counterproductive. In my opinion, grassroots activism without professional organizers, goes the way of the Occupy Movement, and withers and dies. Compare this to the success of the CIA orchestrated colored revolutions in the former Eastern Bloc that were even able to use a former Pope as a Washington mouthpiece. As far as “grassroots” activist movements, this former seasoned KGB defector ( now deceased) doesn’t even believe they exists:

    1. Problem is TPTB are absolute masters of co-opting and infiltrating large activist movements. They efficiently manufacture dissent to compartmentalize and contain any possible organic dissent that may arise and this is largely what Assange / Wikileaks was about, and highly likely Snowden as well (the roles played Greenwald and Omidyar in being the official disseminators is the slam dunk, as fleshed out by James Corbett and Sibel Edmonds). We can simultaneously embrace and support the actions of whistleblowers while being honest about Assange being a clear Establishment agent. BTW, there were many early signs of a major psy op and well timed articles by Lila Rajiva writing for Veteran’s Today and Prof. Michel Chussodovsky provided additional confirmation of the Assange anomaly. I found Rajiva’s personal commentary on gatekeeper The Daily Bell as she voiced her frustration that she gave them important tips on Assange and they ran with her story but did not give her any credit. The bottom line is we have to try to teach as many people as possible to become critical thinkers and learn to sort the wheat from the chaff. I believe what Mike Ruppert said was true, Occupy showed what can happen when the masses start to put the puzzle together, a nascent catalyst of real insight was forming and that’s when the Feds moved in.

      1. no, occupy had no ideological theory, so could be brutalized in submission and disintegration.

      2. The fact that Snowden came from a family that was tied into a Manson-like cult called the Family raises suspicion. CIA and FBI Intelligence squads are deeply entrenched in the cult movement in America. The practical reason for this is raising money through the rackets for black ops, and having useful and disposable Manchurian candidates and sex slaves for honey pot operations. Certainly, Austrialia’s intelligence agency would have provided access to the Family cult, and, by extension to Assange, to CIA. Another easy thing to spot is that Snowden’s stripper “girlfriend” was a plant to control and steer him. To what extent their actions were coordinated, manipulated and/or represented classic intelligence blowback is murky. As with all things related to intelligence operations nothing is cut and dry and everyone involved is a plausible pawn, useful idiot or genuine defector.

        1. I had a stripper girlfriend in DC in the late 70’s. I had no idea that she was a government agent. But now, I see that “everyone involved is a plausible pawn”.

  4. Way off Topic but I went that site history as a weapon and tried to bookmark it and Google takes over my books marks, won’t let me access my folders anymore unless I sign in and ALL my NEW book marks appear to be on Googles server now not my computer.

    I tried to book mark something different and same thing..”welcome to Chromes new NSA book marks, we WANT to know all your business”

    Switching back to Firefox(yuk) and erasing all book marks

  5. Really inciteful remarks mike, heheh.

    I will not be on your list however, as I prefer to go along with general consensus. I really did like Fetzers quip stating that due to no more draft the repercussions of dumbed down (politically, globally) people is the result.

  6. Very nice piece, thanks. In my mind there is no question that most of those indicated are political prisoners. There are a great many. Only a few are well known.

    We have only recently become aware of this country’s propensity for black ops and setting up patsies. It has been going on longer than our awareness.

    Dr. Fetzer is largely correct, I think. There wasn’t a day that went by then that the Viet Nam war wasn’t on our minds. It is not that everyone was active in resisting it, it was a sea change in thinking about “defense” and war and what they really were.

    Up to then people largely believed the WWII propaganda that we only entered conflicts for noble reasons. Suddenly we were bombarding asian farmers.

    Virtually everyone was involved in finding a better future. There was hope. Of all the things that have died since then, hope is the worst victim. Instead of hope, we have “austerity”, war, repression.

    It has been said that the art of ruling is to keep the subjects just at the point of rebellion. I think that is true. What we see today is the attempt to “lower that bar”. Hope is gone. How meager an existence will the masses tolerate before rebellion?

    The wars and manufactured “terrorism” are to provide excuses for your “sacrifice”. The controllers never sacrifice. No austerity for them. It’s a “goldmine deal”. They get the gold, we get the shaft.

  7. Very insightful and thoughtful piece. We must recognize the importance of engaging in smart civil disobedience, “being the change” on a daily basis, and ready to defend ourselves. However, resorting to violence is antithetical to the greater movement and devolves into the elites’ philosophy of the end justifies the means. That’s not the way out of the Matrix. We can’t solve our problems with the same kind of thinking we used to create them. Someone very smart said that.

    It’s past time for the public to finally connect all of the dots so we can break free of these chains and enter a true knowledge age that empowers individuals, families, and communities in way few can imagine. Entropy is on the elites’ doorstep, waiting to unravel their artificial constructs held together with lies and ever increasingly complex machinations.

  8. In response to Mike Peclcek’s questions.

    “Given what we know of fake terror events in recent years, are we to assume that all these events were organic?”


    “Second question:
    Why are almost all of those people from the ‘60s and ‘70s, that era?
    Is it because we have lost heart? I asked Jim Fetzer about this. His response:
    Mike, Nixon ended the draft and the consequences have been enormous. Most families no longer care about issues of war and peace because they know that, whatever happens, their children will not be affected. There were real reasons for the young to resist. Now they don’t care. Jim “

    The reasons are many that we APPEAR to have “lost heart” and stopped street resistance activity.
    Certainly Dr. Fetzer’s reason is valid and important, but it is more complex than that. I do not think, or no longer think, resistance actions such as happened in the ‘60s and ‘70s era are an essential ingredient of “caring.”

    “Street” resistance actions can easily be ineffective waste of human capital or just plain stupid these days.

    “But my questions here are more about the motivation, of moving, getting off the sofa, out the door, down the street. … to become more deeply involved…”
    Again, I say that “Street”-type resistance actions can easily be ineffective waste of human resources or just plain stupid these days.

    I think moving and getting off the sofa can mean intelligent stealth strategies/actions that may not at all be visible or physical movements of activists.

    “But how can we go forward without any thought to those who are STILL in prison for revolution, fighting against America, as we also say we are.”

    As a Christian, I want to do more than give “thought” to those who are still in prison, I want to pray for them, for their souls and for their release from prison NOW. It would be helpful for someone to write an article with a comprehensive list of the names of these individuals as I think I can pray for them better that way.

    “…who are STILL in prison for revolution, fighting against America, as we also say we are.”

    Watch your pronouns, sir. “We” and “I” do NOT say we are “fighting against America.” Also I am not certain what those who are still in prison were actually fighting against or fighting for. I do not want anyone defining my battles for me or telling what “side” I am on. I pray for them because I must do so, not necessarily because I identify with their cause or ideology.

    A couple of last comments.

    “Grassroots Revolution vs. Astroturf Terror”
    I “have a problem” with almost every word in that title especially the word “Revolution.”
    From my Catholic religious teaching, “revolution” is not an good thing for me to be involved in. Counter-revolution is great, but must be primarily a spiritual endeavor. Peace and justice for all are this-world system goals and I am to be primarily but not exclusively concerned with my soul and that of others and its eternal destination. Worldly actions that are not motivated from a love of Christ are doomed.

    The comments I have read so far here are outstanding. I appreciate all these very much.

  9. snowden was a rouse…a fake…the litmus test to see how the general public will react. They want revolt…why buy so many bullets and arms? they want to get you riled up so you will step out of line and be flagged..collected..rounded up and dealt with.

  10. 1. “Why are almost all of those people from the ‘60s and ‘70s, that era?” This would be a good question for Many of this blog’s readers would wonder why Tsarnaev is not listed as a U.S. political prisoner of much interest, even though he has not been sentenced yet. Ditto for the various “terrorists” who have been imprisoned post-9/11 under much suspicion that they were patsies or useful idiots and whom the article alludes to. Ditto for the Guantanamo detainees. Is it that have chosen to ignore 9/11-induced terror-related incarceration? That they have chosen to focus only on a specific type of political imprisonment?

    2. Thinking of it, modern U.S. dissidence rarely emphasizes a direct overthrow of the U.S. government. 9/11 Truth definitely undermines it, but mostly indirectly, by exposing its role as the largest sponsor of terrorism in the world. Maybe this is one effect of the 9/11 paradigm shift. And this evidently makes it more difficult to imprison dissidents without criminalizing non-violent thought and giving publicity to information that the U.S. government would rather keep the public ignorant of. Just imagine boasting: “Prof. Tracy: 15 years for refusing to certify under penalty of perjury that the Twin Towers were destroyed by Osama bin Laden’s hijackers.”

    3. In the post-9/11 world, it is obvious that violence is the purview of the state and of whoever control it. The idea of overthrowing the U.S. government by persuading ordinary people to load their firearms, organize themselves in a well-regulated militia, 2nd amendment-style, co-opt their local police and sheriff, and conquer their state governments, is less realistic than the still more elusive idea of making them understand the basics of Building 7’s destruction. So is the idea of organizing frustrated and determined people to perform puny political terror or killings while Homeland Security can not only track their cell phone activity, but also blow up an atomic bomb in a major law enforcement facility at any time and blame them for it.

    4. Advocating for the release of’s prisoners is an interesting endeavor, but also a controversy, as its opponents will have no trouble organizing a grassroots movement to keep them in prison “for very good reasons.” It will become a wedge issue like many others, dividing the population for at most a limited benefit. Activists who think that they will personally benefit from it may want to do it. Activists who want to fix the world will be more productive by spreading the knowledge that TV failed to inform the public of the extraordinary sudden, rapid and complete disintegration of a certain NYC skyscraper by an office fire. In fact, a point could be made that once humanity has absorbed the historical paradigm shift that 9/11 portends, the disposition of’s prisoners may clear itself.


  11. The cartel has taken sophisticated means to extort their blood money and prefers their hosts remain viable contributors.

    The modern day protester with intelligence and goals of squelching government corruption might be labeled the Tea Party activists that the news has majorly downplayed. This fanatical group has a unique ‘green’ quality, where ever they march, they do not leave trash.

    Catherine Engelbrecht and her family have battled hard and she is my hero. How many agencies of government attack would you face before surrendering? God speed Catherine!

    Do not know how many Americans have been murdered or jailed without cause, we are all in a deep pile of shit, it’s time we work together or we will suffocate in total.

    Everything is a distraction, the green activists worried about that stupid stinking smelt fish and sending fresh water to the ocean is better than…

  12. Good questions always elicit good comments here on MHB.

    I have mulled over them and decided first to put my deeply held passions up front. Long ago I escaped the military matrix that held me in a supine position for ages. Along about that time, a Broadway musical based on Miguel de Cervante’s masterpiece, “Don Quixote” was sweeping into the public consciousness with its lovely themesong, “Dream the Impossible Dream.”

    I listened and understood its underlying meaning and it changed my perspectives dramatically.

    Sharing this video to show fellow iconoclasts that the hope for freedom echoes through the ages. Cervantes was up against the Spanish Inquisition–the Vatacan’s heirarchical power cartel of his time.:

    “To dream the impossible dream/
    To fight the unbeatable foe/
    to bear the unbearable sorrow/
    to run where the brave dare not go”…

    So it is with all who have the courage to follow one’s conscience, regardless of the danger, the loneliness of the road.

    Peace and God Speed to all on this quest. We are more than a ‘cult’ seeking reaffirmation from other ‘conspiracy theorists’, as opponents chide.

    1. Hear, hear, Marilyn Jay!

      As I just posted on another topic: It’s not impossible to live righteously and morally in a corrupt and unjust world, it’s just harder.

  13. First of all Mr. Palecek claims not to advocate violence or bombing, and then nullifies the claim with the potential inception that doing so is to become more deeply involved than to join a march while aiming the assumptive ridicule of pizza and beer mentality at those who do. I’ve noted that he uses the term march and not any of the many ways to induct change. Marching is a martial term and what is argued is a false binary choice between effective and ineffective warfare instead of the also binary but true choice between war and peace. Our most comprehensive contexts accommodate a plurality of polarities, and when the geometric structure of systems is understood there is far less likelyhood of mistaking a detached simulated polarity as anything viable.

    What makes Mr. Palecek’s nostalgia for a more martial response to the encroachments of tyranny seem sustainable for some, is the complete disregard for the metacultural context where the approach to the vital task of discerning truth from illusion is cultural but eventually comes head on with a masquerade of itself. It’s a quicksand of confusion where the practitioners of sophistry can have a field day.

    The enemies of liberty know full well the power and necessity of liberties culture and have been, and are, devising the mimicry that is the matrix for their destructive incepts. It’s metaphorically the nano aluminum wrapped in the noble sounding cause of geoengineered salvation. Along with the health defying soup of mercury, fluorine, aspertame and gmo’s, comes the prime ingredient for Alzheimer’s. The culture of liberty does not prescribe forgetting but what can you do when the sky is full of it?

  14. Many issues surface on this topic.

    a) The question of when and why the colleges erupted in rebellion during the Vietnam war in 1969–which had been going on for the whole decade. It was the institution of the draft lottery system that exercised the more wealthy and educated men to dissent. Many knowing their lives were on the line awoke to the urgency of war and death itself. Many burned draft cards or letters summoning them to physicals pursuant to induction into the US Army. Many fled to Canada to escape.

    b) Second question: What happened to the fervor of the counterculture born out of dissilusion with American inequality along race, class, gender lines, et al?
    Author David Brooks created an insightful look at what happened to devotees of an era roiling in counterculture upheaval with his tome “Bobos in Paradise: The New Rich and How They Got There.”

    A Bobo is a portmanteau contruct of Bohemian and Bourgoiseie. The rebels did not fade away into the mists of history, they mutated and survive now in virtual high style among the most strident conspicuous consumers. Visit the Amazon site for further reading. Very telling and may dispell some closely-held myths punctuating a mythical era.

    1. As Marilyn said, many topics are elicited from this article. It’s also true that it’s very easy to put a label on a grouping of disparate elements and treat it as an homogenized whole. Kind of like putting bohemian and bourgeois into a single term. Her interest in campus located rebellion does give some specificity so I’d like to go into it.

      I was loitering around on the University of Michigan during one of the ROTC takeovers and for awhile anyone curious could go in and look at what they accomplished. There was nothing to see and there was no bloody incident. I often think that much of the military is just as fed up with what’s messed up. This was close to the time when some of those labeled flower children were putting flowers into the muzzles of National Guard guns. The war was a display of unmitigated evil and was so unpopular that no-one needed to stress the point above anyone else.

      There was a humanizing cultural movement underway and the PTB couldn’t stand it. Perhaps you may consider that none of this false polarization of left-right classification instances found on this page has addressed the peaceful aspect of the cognitive, ergo peaceful, revolution, that could only be stopped with a well coordinated firefighter’s analog of a backfire. Many of the hippies of yesterdays are afraid now to even mention they were once referred to as a hippie, immersed in the excitement of a whole new and relatively wholesome way to be. Peace was a kick and war profiteering was the effluent.

      The centerpiece of the backfire amidst the many assassinations of so many of our musical heroes was the so called Manson murders. This is where Mr. Palecek’s question comes in as to whether we can be sure if any signature event was real or contrived. Other than his presumption that “we” are “fighting against America”, the problem is not that he sympathizes with the plight of political prisoners, but rather his sympathetic emphasis on violent political warfare. The Manson patsy entrapment was a hugely successful false flag operation. Manson wore the costume of a “hippie” and the atrocities that were attributed to him nearly singularly killed that free style movement that once consisted of an intercommunicating people.

    2. Even when it was happening (and I lived in Southern California at the time), the so-called hippie movement was ALWAYS spearheaded by the elites. If you were a hippie, you were fairly rich and well-connected. As Time Magazine reported on it, I could see even as a teenager that it was not coming from the youth itself, but was stage-managed. The first hippie I ever heard about was the daughter of a two-star general (her father was later one of the command in Vietnam). The next hippies I met were from Palos Verdes, one of the poshest suburbs of LA. I never saw regular, cash-strapped kids joining up to hit the road as beggars, because they could not survive that way.

      When I visited my brother (a real hippie too) at a hot springs, the weekend parking lot was full of BMW’s and Mercedes from San Francisco and what was later known as Silicon Valley. That the mega-rich computer culture has been Bobo all along is never lost on me. In it, you would be uncool if you were like a Seattle Bill Gates type. Oh, no, that would never make you a darling of a TED talk.

  15. First, the graphic for this article is totally excellent. the fifties-ish teacher, the blackboard, the pointer, etc.

    Second, the first question by the author is worthy of being reworded and asked again, not instead of the first wording, but in addition to the first wording:

    “Given what we know of fake terror events in recent years, are we to assume that all these events were organic?”

    Given what we know of real events in recent years, are we to assume that all of these events were false flags?

    Both questions are resting on false assumptions. “All” of the terror events are not organic. “All” of the terror events are not false flags. Should a reader insist upon only one or the other of these questions as being the “only” correct fashion for starting an analysis, that reader can save a few minutes by dismissing what follows.

    Some of them are real, and some are false. The difficulty lies firmly in an accurate understanding and portrayal of the events. It is true that our government has not been transparent, and is getting even more opaque. As is well known, our next president is structuring her campaign around a narrative of shady dealings that are not “technically” illegal, and is falsely claiming special privileges of privacy and convenience regarding her record as a public servant.

    Our current president is building carefully on the deceit established by his predecessor. The next one will have powers and capabilities unimagined by the Framers. Fortunately, we have a modicum of free speech today, arguing for hope. Moving right along…

    Mr. Fetzer’s observation about war is spot on, but only a part of the problem. “There were real reasons for the young to resist. Now they don’t care.” The “don’t care” aspect has to do with the cultivated decline of morality in the country, and the unfortunate rise of relative morality, which results in the culture of convenient death, where death for others is ok if it is convenient for the death dealer. But Mr. Palacek closes by arguing to continue “fighting against America, as we also say we are”.

    In other words, fighting against the principle that all people are created equal, and that our Creator has endowed us with inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. He conflates, deliberately, I argue, the ideals of America with the wrong actions of a concerted group of powerful people who only care about power over other individuals.

    1. I appreciate your comments.

      However, it appears that you are deliberately conflating “the principle that all people are created equal, and that our Creator has endowed us with inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” with the “ideals of America.”

      The words — equal, rights, life, liberty, happiness and Creator are defined by Enlightenment, Judeo-Masonic founding principles.

      1. So what if they are. Does that make them any less right? Just because Masons used Platonic solids and Euclidian geometric forms (as represented the best construction principles of their day, for wood and stone) does that make them any less useful if you are building something using traditional materials? We could quibble that math is a construction, which it is, but 2 + 2 = 4 is the truth within that number system.

        Equality meant something once – not the Egalite of the French Revolution (which was overthrowing a powerful centralized government that had grown tyrannical, and replacing it with a Terror that they considered a temporary measure – but now they still have strong centralization). It meant something because Americans had given their all to establish a new way of life and nation, where the ordinary person could read and write (they could not do that in England for another hundred years – they were privileged rulers on top of an illiterate peasantry unless the Bible-reading elements were there to educate coal miners).

        I have no trouble with who our Founding Fathers were or their memberships in Masonic organizations. I DO have trouble with a top-down system lying to the public and treating us like the enemy which must be occupied by them. I don’t care how old their manipulation might be historically, but there is no doubt it has grown infinitely more powerful over our lives today.

        1. Exactly, Musings.

          Another way that I put it is that somebody has to be the last slave holder, or else slavery will never end.

          I deliberately equate the principle that all people are created equal, and that our Creator has endowed us with inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness with the ideals of America.

          Many people the world over, and many people here in Amerika do not share this belief.

        2. reply to
          John Fornaro says:
          April 28, 2015 at 10:22 AM

          “I deliberately equate the principle that all people are created equal, and that our Creator has endowed us with inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness with the ideals of America.”

          I do not. I try to view the social order from a Christian perspective.
          Nowhere in the scriptures does it say our Creator created us “equal,” however it does say that we are created with free will and we are all given an equal shot in choosing our soul’s destiny, i.e., our salvation that is so mercifully offered to us by the Sacrifice of the One Who is our Creator.

          I believe in the doctrine of subsidiarity, which is the Church’s way of keeping the State small and every matter being handled at the lowest, most local, level possible.

          But we need government and we need hierarchy and we need Authority and law because the “bible tells me so.”

        3. Everything Jesus did was about touching untouchables (lepers) and regarding them as human beings. If that isn’t establishing the principle of equality, I don’t know what is. Then considering children to be worthy of consideration in a society which enslaved them and blighted their lives – he said they were of the kingdom of heaven and if anyone should harm they, they should have a millstone put around their necks and be thrown in the sea. Strong words, again upholding the underdog.

        4. I’m with musings. Jesus told His disciples to go into all the nations, including Samaria–which Pharisees would not even pass through because the people there by their nature were unclean. (He also gave the parable of the Good Samaritan, to emphasize the point.)

          If all are not created equal, that would mean there is more than one species of human.

          The problem is that all CULTURES are not equal. A child born into, say, pre-Columbian Yucatan, could very likely end up being sacrificed on Montezuma’s alter, and then eaten by the Aztec citizenry. But that same child, were he captured by Cortez and taken to Spain as an exhibit and then raised as a Spaniard, well, that would not be a miraculous transformation of the kid’s essential nature. He was always equal in his humanity to both Montezuma and the King of Spain, no matter which culture he had the misfortune to be born into.

        5. The doctrine of subsidiarity. Thanks for a “learn something new every day” moment! The learning, for me, was in the term not in the concept.

          My intuitive doctrine in matters of government is that which governs least governs best. That this idea was also born of Enlightenment and Judeo-Masonic founding principles, is of no pragmatic continuing utility in today’s world, where it could inform leadership to properly conform to the ideals of America, even if it those founding principles were indeed historically and factually based on Enlightenment and Judeo-Masonic concepts. Put more briefly: “So what if they are.”

          No doubt that Scripture does not specifically say the words “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness”. Nor does Scripture explicitly say that “all people are created equal, and that our Creator has endowed us with inalienable rights”. So what if it doesn’t?

          From Galatians 3:28:

          “There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is no male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.”

          A narrow interpretation of this, an all too common occurance in today’s fractured attention spans, would insist that nobody but Jewish or Greek males and females would be seen as equal in Christ’s eyes. But I hold the radical notion that we are all seen as equal in Christ’s eyes.

          The Bible tells me so.

  16. Anyone up for a laugh? This trial seems to be about some FBI informants who supposedly “went rogue” and their fascinating witch of a mother, the femme fatale of the black comedy that was the BMB.

    As P.T. Barnum put it, there’s one born every minute:

    Hope this link works. Otherwise just google today’s story in the Globe. And don’t forget to read the comments (and to understand that any sensible ones questioning the bombing will be flushed)

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